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Shared governance

Best practices for "shared governance"

Most theological schools, like other institutions of higher education, operate under the principles of "shared governance." That means that various groups -- like the board, the president, the faculty, the church body, and sometimes others -- share the legitimate authority over the school.  Negotiating the complexities of shared governance is sometimes a problem in the setting of theological education. So In Trust's program developer, Rebekah Burch Basinger, has assembled a few articles that can help illuminate shared governance. Click on the titles to read the full text. "Faculty Professionalism: Failures of Socialization and the Road to Loss of Professional Autonomy." By Neil Hamilton. Appeared in the Fall 2006 issue of Liberal Education. An excerpt: As the American tradition of academic freedom evolved over the course of the past century, boards have acknowledged the importance of freedom of inquiry and speech to the university's unique mission of creating and disseminating knowledge. Accordingly, ...

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Best practices for "shared governance"

Every institution has some kind of governance -- perhaps an all-powerful founder who makes all decisions, or a board of directors, a bishop, or an executive council.  But theological schools, like other institutions of higher education, have "shared governance." That means that various groups share the legitimate authority over the school. In most schools, there are three or four groups sharing authority: Board. The board of directors or trustees hires and fires the president, sets long-term goals, approves and oversees the budget, and monitors strategic indicators. President's office. The president's office includes not just the single person of the president, but also the "cabinet" or chief administrative officers. Faculty acting as a group. The faculty generally have an official responsibility for curricular decisions. They work with the president's office and the board on major decisions like creating new academic programs. Individual professors are generally not part of the "shared ...

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